Estimated reading time: 2 minutes, 24 seconds

Estimated reading time: 2 minutes, 24 seconds

Estimated reading time: 2 minutes, 24 seconds

Estimated reading time: 2 minutes, 24 seconds

I’m increasingly convinced that it’s important to cite our students as active human participants with names in the scholarship of teaching and learning, not just as anonymous data points. Obviously there are issues around the power dynamic of attributed comments (as you list), but I feel like the “anonymize everything!” solution is often just a “social science-y” handwaving to negate the issues around anonymization. So good for you for running straight at it!

I think the big question is how much you want the students involved in the authoring of the chapter. Mark Carnes did a great job of incorporating student voice in _Minds On Fire_ (including some of the reflective work that I think you’re considering) and talks at length about the issue of student agency in the book, but while giving extensive credit to the named students, he’s retained sole authorship for himself. You could go a notch above that by circulating your draft to the students (or a select group of them) for comment, and thanking them for their input in the text, but treating it more as acknowledgement of a peer reviewer/trusted colleague than a co-author. Your Option 4 is really interesting – after the semester, solicit a couple of students who you’d really like to keep working with. Personally, I wouldn’t try to engage the whole class at this point in the project or the semester… that seems like a major re-conception of both the chapter and the course, so I’d probably avoid it.