Beautiful Chaos & Messing Around – Unwriting #rhizo14 collaborative autoethnography

So Keith and I were DMing the other day and came up with this crazy idea that just proceeded to get crazier and more complex and definitely more beautiful in its chaos. I think we created a monster, but a good one, really 😉 Keith’s already blogged about it here. It started out as me…

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Envisioning Process: Paradox of Leadership & Participation for #rhizo14 CAE (Collaborative Autoethnography)

I’m torn 😉 Between leading with what knowledge and experience I have, and saying it early and outright, thus imposing some sort of power. Once something is said by someone who is confident enough in themselves, it becomes more difficult for others to contribute. When I finished my PhD, I promised myself I would start…

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The literature on CAE (Collaborative Autoethnography)

I’ve been reading a bit lately about collaborative autoethnography (and it’s quite what I expected it to be). Mainly this article on mothering & this one by Geist-Martin et al) and this book (Chang et al), though I also have plans to read this open access book on (non-collaborative) autoethnography recommended by Penny. And also this…

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Doing Autoethnography on the Internet – Experimenting with Style

One of the things that frustrated my PhD supervisor when I was submitting chapters to him as I went about writing my dissertation, was that I kept experimenting with styles of writing; as a qualitative/interpretive researcher, and someone who reads a lot of fiction, I was heavily influenced by narrative writing styles that bordered on…

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Invisible Moments in Internet Autoethnography

I’ve written before about the tricky thing about doing research on the internet is..there are many public artifacts to draw upon, but also so much that’s happening in private and offline that is invisible to a researcher. Of course, a researcher can do interviews. But I always felt that interviews only captured a moment in…

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Autoethnography on Virtually Connecting part 1

Before i start, I should probably write a broad research question. Which is: how has my thinking about Virtually Connecting evolved over time? How has the experience of Virtually Connecting changed my understanding of online communication , relationships , intimacy, learning, hospitality , citizenship , power, social justice? My research paradigm is within interpretive and…

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Going Meta: Doing autoethnography on the internet

So I’ve been invited to write a chapter about doing autoethnography on the internet. And I thought, hey, I can do this. I’ve co-authored 3 collaborative autoethnographies, 2 of them fully online with collaborators talking about online experiences… one of them with a colleague and students in my f2f teaching, but the writing of the…

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A Small Victory for Autoethnography in MOOCs

I had a small victory the other day. Good news in the midst of a difficult time in my personal life. I received official acceptance of my first Collaborative Autoethnography article (co-authored of course, “collaborative”) on MOOCs in a journal. No, it wasn’t a #rhizo14 CAE article and that stings because… For many reasons. But…

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Why #edtech Needs More Autoethnography

I remember during my PhD viva the external examiner told me that for research to be considered “good”, it needed to be saying something significant about something important. Those are pretty loose criteria for rigor in research, but they’re pretty good rules of thumb for what I personally value reading about. I don’t want to…

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Even in my shoes, you’re still you: on autoethnography

I’ve always had issues with the expression to “put yourself in my shoes”. It’s overly simplistic, it assumes that once you put on the shoes, you’re seeing things with a different lens. But it’s not true. You’re still yourself in someone else’s (probably ill-fitting shoes). The expression “walk a mile in my shoes” goes a…

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